Service-Learning Local School System Specific Information

Each of the 24 school systems in Maryland, as well as Maryland School for the Blind, Maryland School for the Deaf, Juvenile Services Education, and SEED School implement the service-learning graduation requirement differently so they can most effectively tailor the program to the unique needs of their students, schools, and community. There is a designated contact for service-learning in every school system who oversees the program.


 Students sew quilts for Project Linus to be given to children in the hospital.
Students sew quilts for Project Linus to be given to children in the hospital.


Because all 24 school systems in Maryland have unique academic and community needs, they all chose to design their programs locally. Therefore, there are 24 different implementation models around the state. Some districts require students to conduct individual service-learning projects in the community. Most school districts infuse service-learning activities into the existing curriculum to help students use their academic skills to solve real community problems. Districts are encouraged to review and revise their plans, based on lessons learned during implementation.

Despite the variance between district plans, all 24 Maryland school systems infuse service-learning into existing courses as all or part of their plan. By adding experiential, community-based service activities to existing curricula, teachers enhance their students' learning. In most cases, students complete all three service-learning elements--preparation, action, and reflection--as part of their regular school day. In other systems, students carry out one or more elements as part of a class and perform the remaining piece(s) on their own after school or on weekends.

Some school systems require that students conduct independent service-learning projects to fulfill part of the graduation requirement. In these systems, students are given guidelines stating how much service is expected and which organizations are appropriate sites for service. Students perform service projects in the community, independent of their school, and keep track of the hours of service.


Contact information for the service-learning coordinator in each school system, a link to their local implementation plan, and information about their Service-Learning Fellows can be obtained through the local school system links below.

Local School System Service-Learning Contacts Links

Special Programs Service-Learning Contact Links:
Juvenile Services Education Program
Maryland School for the Blind
Maryland School for the Deaf
SEED School of Maryland